Ofsted and Performance Data

Performance Data

At Brunton First School our assessment system includes:

  • Ongoing assessment against the National Curriculum objectives by the class teacher throughout each lesson, through questioning, observation and dialogue.
  • Children knowing what they are being asked to learn and more importantly, why.
  • Primarily staff will focus on immediate feedback; either verbal or written in line with our Marking and Feedback policy. Effective feedback can turn misconceptions into learning opportunities.
  • Questioning: using questions assess prior and current learning as well as probing for deep understanding.
  • Peer-assessment and self-assessment: giving students time to assess their own and each other’s work; identifying areas of strength and areas for further development.
  • Differentiation is through questioning and scaffolding individual pupils receive in class during their work. In the classroom, scaffolding can include modelling a skill, providing hints or cues and adapting material or activity (Copple & Bredekamp, 2009)
  • The role of the teacher is not to teach information by rote learning, but instead to facilitate the learning process. Lessons are designed to help children discover the relationship between bits of information (Bruner, 1961)

At Brunton First School, we use a range of strategies, both formal and informal, to measure the progress of all our children.  Right across the school, assessment for learning techniques are deeply embedded.  Learning outcomes are routinely shared with children and children know what they need to do in order to be successful in each lesson.    Assessment is used to inform teaching and learning, to underpin the curriculum and to inform pupil progress.

Progress refers to the rate of learning and how well children are moving on in their learning and continually track this throughout the year to make sure that all children are making at least good progress.

When children are not at age related expectation or are not making good progress, we target and intervene to provide support to ensure that everyone is learning as well as they can in school.

Throughout our Early Years setting, practitioners use the Development Matters and Early Learning Goals (ELGs) as a part of their daily observation, assessment and planning. On-going formative assessment is at the heart of effective early years practice.

These judgements are used to help track pupil progress alongside evidence in pupil books, ongoing assessments, observations and notes.

Children are defined as having reached a good level of development at the end of the EYFS if they have achieved at least the expected level in:

  • The early learning goals in the prime areas of learning (personal, social and emotional development; physical development; and communication and language) and;
  • The early learning goals in the specific areas of mathematics and literacy.

This check demonstrates how well a child can use the phonics skills they’ve learned up to the end of Year 1.  It consists of 40 words and non-words that your child reads 1:1 with a teacher.

All pupils sit the following tests at the end of Year 2:

  • Reading
  • Mathematics
  • Writing (teacher assessment)

Good level of Development

The proportion of children attaining a good level of development is higher than the national and local average.

Year 1 Phonics Screen

Percentage of children meeting the standard is higher than the national and local average.

94% met the expected standard in the Year 2 Phonics resist.

 

Key Stage 1 Assessments

Outcomes at the expected standard were above National in Reading, Writing and Maths.

Year 4 Multiplication Check

83% scored 20 and above.  45.6% scored 25/25.

Ofsted reports

Click on the parent view link below to share your views on our school

Performance Data

At Brunton First School our assessment system includes:

  • Ongoing assessment against the National Curriculum objectives by the class teacher throughout each lesson, through questioning, observation and dialogue.
  • Children knowing what they are being asked to learn and more importantly, why.
  • Primarily staff will focus on immediate feedback; either verbal or written in line with our Marking and Feedback policy. Effective feedback can turn misconceptions into learning opportunities.
  • Questioning: using questions assess prior and current learning as well as probing for deep understanding.
  • Peer-assessment and self-assessment: giving students time to assess their own and each other’s work; identifying areas of strength and areas for further development.
  • Differentiation is through questioning and scaffolding individual pupils receive in class during their work. In the classroom, scaffolding can include modelling a skill, providing hints or cues and adapting material or activity (Copple & Bredekamp, 2009)
  • The role of the teacher is not to teach information by rote learning, but instead to facilitate the learning process. Lessons are designed to help children discover the relationship between bits of information (Bruner, 1961)

At Brunton First School, we use a range of strategies, both formal and informal, to measure the progress of all our children.  Right across the school, assessment for learning techniques are deeply embedded.  Learning outcomes are routinely shared with children and children know what they need to do in order to be successful in each lesson.    Assessment is used to inform teaching and learning, to underpin the curriculum and to inform pupil progress.

Progress refers to the rate of learning and how well children are moving on in their learning and continually track this throughout the year to make sure that all children are making at least good progress.

When children are not at age related expectation or are not making good progress, we target and intervene to provide support to ensure that everyone is learning as well as they can in school.

Throughout our Early Years setting, practitioners use the Development Matters and Early Learning Goals (ELGs) as a part of their daily observation, assessment and planning. On-going formative assessment is at the heart of effective early years practice.

These judgements are used to help track pupil progress alongside evidence in pupil books, ongoing assessments, observations and notes.

Children are defined as having reached a good level of development at the end of the EYFS if they have achieved at least the expected level in:

  • The early learning goals in the prime areas of learning (personal, social and emotional development; physical development; and communication and language) and;
  • The early learning goals in the specific areas of mathematics and literacy.

This check demonstrates how well a child can use the phonics skills they’ve learned up to the end of Year 1.  It consists of 40 words and non-words that your child reads 1:1 with a teacher.

All pupils sit the following tests at the end of Year 2:

  • Reading
  • Mathematics
  • Writing (teacher assessment)

Good level of Development

The proportion of children attaining a good level of development is higher than the national and local average.

Year 1 Phonics Screen

Percentage of children meeting the standard is higher than the national and local average.

94% met the expected standard in the Year 2 Phonics resist.

 

Key Stage 1 Assessments

Outcomes at the expected standard were above National in Reading, Writing and Maths.

Year 4 Multiplication Check

83% scored 20 and above.  45.6% scored 25/25.

Ofsted reports

Click on the parent view link below to share your views on our school